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GUIDE TO FOOD & WATER STORAGE

VERSION 3.0

By Jesse Reed

posted January 23, 1999

Disclaimer:
This guide is designed to provide general information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is distributed with the understanding that the author is not engaged in rendering any professional services. It is not to be utilized as a substitute for professional advice or services. We believe the following information to be true and accurate, but make no claim as to the accuracy or reliability, either expressed or implied. This information is presented for informational purposes only. The author permits individuals to copy or distribute this document -in whole or in part- with accompanying credits. However it is not to be sold without written permission from the author.

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INDEX
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What To Store
How Much To Store
Where To Buy It
How To Package Food For Storage
Related Food Storage Products
Water Storage Products
What's New In Version 3.0
Ordering This Guide

 

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What To Store

Grains

The foundation of all food storage programs should be grains, which are nutritious, as well as inexpensive and easy to store. (See below for a list of bulk food suppliers. You should also be able to get these products locally.)

Hard red winter wheat is a good variety of wheat for baking bread and sprouting. Thus you will probably want the majority of your wheat to be hard red winter wheat.

Corn should also be a part of your food storage program. Whole corn has a longer shelf life and retains its nutritional value better than storing cornmeal. Dent corn can be stored for making tortillas.

Brown rice has an advantage over white because of its high nutritional value. However, because of its high fat content, it will not store very long (up to 2-3 years at room temp. with low oxygen levels). White rice will store many years.

Oats are most easily stored in their "rolled" form, as whole oats will have some of the hulls left on.

A variety of other grains such as rye, barley, millet, and pastas can also be included in your storage program.

A grain mill will also be needed for grinding these grains. Sources below: Christian Family Resources, Azure Standard and Millennium Outfitters, L.L.C.

Beans

Soybeans are an essential part of any food storage program, because of their high protein content. Soy can be used in baked goods, or as milk and meat substitutes. Soybeans have a shelf life of only 3-4 years unless packaged in an oxygen-reduced atmosphere.

It would be good to have a variety of other beans, including ones that cook quickly, such as lentils and black beans.

Dehydrated and Freeze-Dried Fruits, Vegetables and Dairy Products

Fruits, vegetables and dairy products, etc, should be purchased professionally dehydrated and prepackaged from a reputable food packing company. The following dehydrated food products are recommended: Milk, butter, egg and cheese powder, and a variety of fruits and vegetables.

Freeze-dried foods are more expensive, and take more space than dehydrated food. However, they have better flavor, and meat is only available freeze-dried.

Sprouts

Because of the fact that storage foods do not include fresh fruits and vegetables, which provide important vitamins and minerals, it is important to be prepared to grow sprouts to replace those “live” foods. Sprouts have higher concentrations of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids than either the seed or the grown plant. Sprouts are fun and easy to grow, and can be used in a variety of ways. Add them to salads, sandwiches, meat loaf, casseroles, bread recipes, etc. Liquify them and add to beverages.

How to Sprout

Soak seeds, beans or grain overnight in 1-Qt. wide-mouth jar filled 1/2 full with warm water. (Start with 1-3 Tbsp. seeds and adjust amount later depending on how full jar becomes when sprouted.) Cover top of jar with cheesecloth, gauze or pantyhose and secure with rubber band or jar ring. In AM, drain water and rinse and drain again well. Store jar in dark place, such as inside kitchen cabinet, or just covered with towel. Rinse seeds 2 - 3 times daily for 2 - 4 days, draining well each time. They may then be eaten or stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. If sprouts seem tough or bitter, they probably were sprouted too long.

Caution: Do not sprout seeds intended for agricultural use as they have been treated with insecticides. Also, tomato and potato seeds are poisonous and must not be sprouted.

Miscellaneous Foods

Items like baking soda, baking powder, gluten, yeast, sugar, honey, salt, bouillon, oils, nuts, peanut butter, etc. also need to be stored. Several of these, including Crisco and oils, can be purchased at a supermarket and stored in their original container safely for a couple of years.

Also you should have a sprouter and sprouting seeds because of their high nutritional value.

Travel / Camping Foods

Travel and camping foods are definitely not essential to a food storage program, but would be useful in certain types of emergencies, such as when you need to leave your home for a period of time.

MRE’s (meals-ready-to-eat) are military meals that are packaged in metalized bags, and can be eaten directly from the package.They have a shelf life of up to ten years if kept at the right temperature. MRE’s can be purchased as either entrees or complete meals. When purchasing MRE’s it is important to be sure that they are fresh and have not been sitting in a hot warehouse for an extended period of time.

Unlike MRE’s, emergency food bars, such as "MainStay" brand, (not to be confused with sports bars), can be stored in a hot environment like the trunk of a car without going bad.

 

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How Much To Store

The following list gives approximate amounts for each type of food for one adult for one year, at approximately 2450 calories per day.

• Grains = 300 pounds
• Beans & Legumes = 75 pounds
• Dairy = 40-50 pounds
• Meat/Meat Substitute = 10 - 20 pounds
• Fruits & Vegetables = 20 - 30 pounds
• Sugars = 60 pounds
• Fats = 20 - 30 pounds

For anyone on an extremely tight budget, the U.S. government recommends the following as a minimum amount to sustain life for one person for one month:

• Wheat = 20 pounds
• Corn = 20 pounds
• Soybeans = 10 pounds
• Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C) = 15 grams
• Salt = 1 pound

 

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Where To Buy It

CAVEAT EMPTOR -- LET THE BUYER BEWARE:

We make the following DISCLAIMER: Vendor names listed on our site have not been screened by us and we make ABSOLUTELY NO claim relative to their product, quality, reliability, service, or ability to make accurate, efficient, or timely deliveries of goods and/or services.
We recommend that you exercise all diligence and take precaution when ordering, especially by mail. Make certain (for future reference), that you obtain a customer number, an order number, and record all pertinent information about the name, address, telephone number, and name of the person and the department who processes your order.
We also suggest that you obtain the name of the shipper (e.g. UPS, FedEx), the shipping charges, the estimated time of arrival (ETA), and ask for full disclosure of the company's return policy in the event that items are not shipped on time, with accuracy, or are damaged or destroyed in transit.
This list is supplied as a public service and we do not endorse or sponsor any vendor, nor do we have any financial gain in any of the companies listed herein.
If you do not receive satisfactory service from any of the vendors listed below, please list your complaint in writing and
send us a copy.
If you know of other vendors not listed here, but some, based on your experience, you believe are worthy of consideration, please
e-mail the vendor's name, and (toll-free) telephone number, website URL, or e-mail address.

Bulk Food Suppliers

Ashland Community Food Store
237 N. First
Ashland, OR 97520
482-2237

Azure Standard
79079 Dufur Valley Rd.
Dufur, OR 9702l
541-467-2230
Complete line of bulk foods, health foods, and nutritional supplements, Country Living Grain Mill, etc.
Minimum order: $400.00 per drop-off point; includes free delivery. Catalog: $0.45

Butte Creek Mill
402 Royal N.
Eagle Point, OR 97524
541-826-3531
Some grains are in stock while others may need to be ordered. It could take a month to receive some items.

Cantwell’s Market
310 Oak
Ashland, OR 97520
488-2120

Cantwell’s Market
2630 E. Barnett Rd.
Medford, OR 97504
858-5444

Cash & Carry
2033 Cardinal Ave.
Medford, OR 97504
773-9849

Costco Wholesale
3639 Crater Lake Hwy.
Medford, OR 97504
541-734-0058
Beans & rice in 25 & 50 pound sacks, and dehydrated potatoes in # 10 cans.

Food-4-Less
2230 Biddle Rd.
Medford, OR
541-779-0171
Check with Bulk Foods Manager for large quantities.

Medford Grange Co-Op
253l S. Pacific Hwy.
Medford, OR. 97501
541-772-4730
Grain not approved for human consumption, but for those of you who have animals to feed this is a good source.

Mormon Storehouse
7575 Pacific Ave.
White City, OR 97503
541-826-4220
Packing supplies and product by the pound. Good prices. #10 canner can be rented by the week to use in your own home.

Mountain People’s Warehouse
12745 Earhart Ave.
Auburn, CA 95602
800-679-6733
Minimum order: $500.00. Catalog: $4.50

Shop’N’Kart
2268 Hwy. 66
Ashland, OR 97520
488-1579

 Wheat Montana Farms
10778 Hwy. 287
Three forks, MT 59752
800-535-2798
4,000 pound minimum

Wild Berries Community Market
106 E. Main St.
Rogue River, OR 97537
541-582-3075

Bulk Dehydrated Food Supplier

Best Prices Storable Foods
1737 Cascade St.
Mesquite, (Dallas) Texas 75149
972-288-1262 (Bruce Hopkins)
Web Site:
http://web2.airmail.net/foodstr2
This food would have to be properly canned, by renting the #10 canner from the Mormon Store.

Prepackaged Dehydrated Food Suppliers

Walton Feed Distributors

Emergency Essentials
National Catalog Sales Office
165 S. Mountain Way Dr.
Orem, Utah 84058
801-222-9596
800-999-1863 (order line)

Nitro-Pak Preparedness Center
147 N. Main St.
Heber City, Utah 84302
800-866-4876

Perma Pak Food Distributors

Preparedness Resources
3999 S. Main, Suite S-2
Salt Lake City, Utah 84107
801-268-3913, ext. 125 (Scott)

Emergency Food Storage
322 Buckingham Pl.
Prescott, AZ 86303

Perma Pak Food
1-800-822-0436 (Steve Shank)

Other Prepackaged Dehydrated Food Companies

Bigfoot
360-256-9131

Carolyn Ghena
2384 Upper River Rd.
Grants Pass, OR 97526
(541)-476-0620
Food counseling is provided for $50.00, but is deducted from the price of your order. $350.00 minimum
Dehydrated prepackaged and bulk foods as well as other survival items.

Alpineaire Foods
PO Box 926
Nevada City, Nevada 95959
800-322-6325
Quality shelf stable foods which have a long storage life, and are free of artificial additives. We specialize in foods which require no cooking - just add water.

Country Harvest Foods
325 West 600 South
Heber City, Utah 84032
Orders: 800-322-2245 / 801-654-5400
Full line of dehydrated foods.

Future foods
PO Box1922
Orem, Utah 84059-1922
800-949-3663
Buy a year’s supply of groceries in advance for no money down and 0% interest for an entire year. Pay as little as $50 per month for an entire year’s supply. No shipping charges on multiple units purchased. Receive entire order within 14 days of credit approval and make no payments for 30 days.

Golden Eagle Enterprizes
9449 N. 90th. St.
Scottsdale, Arizona 85258
1-(800)-447-7911 (Jack Webber)

Homestead Foods
PO Box 96
Victor, MT 59875
800-838-3132
Alpineaire gourmet reserves, shelf-stable food storage systems available.

Major Surplus & Survival
435 W. Alondra Blvd
Gardena, CA 90248
800-441-8855
Large selection MRE’s; emergency food bars, dehydrated and bulk foods. 3 different catalogs available.

Nitro-Pak Preparedness Center
147 N. Main Street
Heber City, Utah 84302
800-866-4876
Dehydrated and freeze-dried "no-cook" storage foods. Catalog - $3.00

Preparedness Resources
3999 S. Main, Suite S-2
Salt Lake City, Utah 84107
Full line of dehydrated foods.

Ponderosa Sports & Mercantile, Inc.
PO Box 1016
Eagle, Idaho 83616
208-939-1513
26 page catalog - $1.00

Ready Reserve Foods
PO Box 697
Beaumont, CA 92223
800-453-2202
100 different dry food products.

Sam Andy Foods
800 W. Airport Fwy., Ste.#1100
Irving, Texas 75062
214-445-4144 / 800-331-0358
Periodic newsletter - call to request your Free copy.

Star Food Processing Inc.
3444 E. Commerce St.
San Antonio, TX 78220
800-882-MEAL
Fully cooked Heat & Eat serving trays. Shelf stable and requires no refrigeration or freezing for storage. Shelf life - 2 yrs.

Storehouse Products
PO Box 690021
San Antonio, Texas 78260
210-690-7632
Complete line of dehydrated foods. Free catalogue.

 

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How To Package Food For Storage

Preserving Your Own Food.  Some foods need to be purchased prepackaged from a food storage company, but for dry foods such as grains and beans, you can cut back on the expense by packaging them yourself.

First you will need to purchase plastic food-grade buckets. After putting the food in your buckets, you will need to have some way of removing the oxygen to preserve the food. One way this is done is by displacing the air inside the bucket with carbon dioxide (CO2), or nitrogen. To do this you will need a gas regulator and wand. The actual process is done by filling your bucket with food, and inserting the wand to the bottom of your bucket. Then just barely crack the valve of the gas cylinder. The bucket will fill with gas in about two to five minutes. To be sure all oxygen has been displaced, hold a lighted match over the bucket. If the flame goes out immediately, you have removed all the oxygen. You may now add an oxygen absorber on top of the food if you wish, to absorb any oxygen that may be left in the bucket, and put the lid on.

Another method is to use about 1/4 lb. dry ice, wrapped in butcher paper, in the bottom of the bucket, with the lid sitting very loosely over the top. Wait about 20-30 min. and close lid. Then watch carefully to see if lid starts to bulge. If it does, loosen lid and wait a few more minutes for dry ice to finish melting. Once the lid no longer bulges, you may close it.

CO2 (dry ice or a CO2 cylinder) has a disadvantage over nitrogen in that it sometimes causes the bucket to suck in and deform, making it impossible to open the lid. The problem is due to the fact that CO2 expands and contracts with the temperature, so the trick is to: 1. Package the food when the temperature is not very hot or cold (lest the buckets collapse or bulge). 2. Be sure the buckets are filled as full and tightly as possible with food, so there is less CO2 to contract, or expand.

NOTE: DO NOT store your food buckets on a concrete floor. Put boards underneath them to keep them off the concrete.

For ordering buckets, gas regulator and wand, and oxygen absorbers, see page 12 &13 .

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Related Food Storage Products

CAVEAT EMPTOR -- LET THE BUYER BEWARE:

We make the following DISCLAIMER: Vendor names listed on our site have not been screened by us and we make ABSOLUTELY NO claim relative to their product, quality, reliability, service, or ability to make accurate, efficient, or timely deliveries of goods and/or services.
We recommend that you exercise all diligence and take precaution when ordering, especially by mail. Make certain (for future reference), that you obtain a customer number, an order number, and record all pertinent information about the name, address, telephone number, and name of the person and the department who processes your order.
We also suggest that you obtain the name of the shipper (e.g. UPS, FedEx), the shipping charges, the estimated time of arrival (ETA), and ask for full disclosure of the company's return policy in the event that items are not shipped on time, with accuracy, or are damaged or destroyed in transit.
This list is supplied as a public service and we do not endorse or sponsor any vendor, nor do we have any financial gain in any of the companies listed herein.
If you do not receive satisfactory service from any of the vendors listed below, please list your complaint in writing and
send us a copy.
If you know of other vendors not listed here, but some, based on your experience, you believe are worthy of consideration, please
e-mail the vendor's name, and (toll-free) telephone number, website URL, or e-mail address.

M&M Industries Inc.
Chattanooga, Tenn.
423-821-3302
White food-grade buckets in various sizes, including 5 and 6 1/2 gallon, with latching screw-top lids and gaskets.
Make sure you ask for white buckets with gaskets, as they also carry grey and black buckets which are NOT F.D.A. approved for food storage.

Berry Plastics
Evansville, ID
208-266-1277
Standard white food-grade buckets

Olson’s
800-258-4292
Standard white food-grade buckets

Medford Tool & Supply
2160 N. Pacific Hwy.
Medford, OR
772-0144
Gas regulator, hose & wand (for CO2)

A & L Welding Products
3100 N. Pacific Hwy.
Medford, OR
779-0167
CO2 Tank

Impap
419 Del Monte Ave.
Pasadena, CA. 91107
1-(626)-398-7300
Oxygen absorbers and mylar bags

Millennium Outfitters, L.L.C.
860 Board Shanty Creek Rd.
Grants Pass, OR. 97527
541-862-2486 / 541-865-3370
Fuel, water & food storage systems, non-electric lighting & appliances, grain grinders, sprouters, medical kits, portable shelters, & more.

 

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Water Storage Products

Storing water is quite simple. In fact everything you need to know is included in the printed copy of this Guide which includes excerpts from the catalog which may be requested from the following address.

Optimum Preparedness Center
Yelm, WA
1-(360)-458-4602
50 page catalog $3.00

 

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What's New in Version 3.0

Addition of sections "Sprouts" and "How to Sprout" listed under "What to Store." Also removal of advice formerly listed as "Update 7-27-98" because, according to the author, it is not always true.

 

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How to Order a Printed Copy of this Guide

Copies of the GUIDE TO FOOD & WATER STORAGE (including advertising copy not available in this HTML version) are available for $2.00 each (including postage) by sending cash, check, or money order to:

Jesse Reed
PO. Box 442
Eagle Point, OR 97524

If you have any questions, please send them to the above address.

NOTE: The author is NOT associated with any of the companies mentioned in this guide.

 

 

Site free use copyright 1998 RV-Y2k Task Force
PAGE [ 1999-11-03 23:40 ] DATE

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